Tiffany & Co. celebrates 175 year anniversary with a new jeweler’s metal – Rubedo

A robin’s-egg-blue box never fails to elicit delight – the kind of unparalleled magic Tiffany & Co. has carefully created during the last 175 years. While the company has become synonymous with covetable jewels and memorable moments (who could forget Audrey Hepburn’s morning gnosh in front of the Fifth Avenue flagship in Breakfast at Tiffany’s?), its commitment to constant innovation is equally remarkable.

From Tiffany’s 1880s revamp of the Great Seal of the United States that’s printed on every dollar bill today, to tapping some of the world’s most renowned designers, to creating a new metal (the blue-hued Rubedo unveiled this year), Tiffany’s brand of elegance always seems perfectly suited to the times – with a little extra sparkle, of course.

So what’s next for the legendary jeweler? First, a celebration in the form of a magnificent new setting for the Tiffany Diamond, one of the largest and finest fancy yellow diamonds in the world. And in August, the design house will grace us with Enchant, the latest jewelry collection, inspired by the natural world. Here’s to another 175 years and many, many more blue boxes.

 

Source: Riviera Magazine – Rock On! Tiffany & Co. celebrates 175 years of legendary design

 

 

Continue reading Tiffany & Co. celebrates 175 year anniversary with a new jeweler’s metal – Rubedo

Go inside the Cardington Sheds with Christopher Nolan on The Dark Knight Rises

The Cardington Sheds (Tony Crowe)

 

From a distance, Christopher Nolan’s Gotham City sure doesn’t look like much. The “skyline” begins to emerge over the horizon in the rolling green farmlands about 50 miles north of London, but there are no gothic spires or granite citadels, just the slanted, pocked roofs of two boxy metal buildings.

But nearing the complex on a winding two-lane road, the immensity of the filmmaker’s make-believe metropolis comes into focus: The structures that looked squat from afar are actually 15 stories tall — and as long as 81-story skyscrapers lying on their sides. Constructed more than 85 years ago to house Britain’s Royal Airship Works, the giant coffin-shaped sheds sat unused or ignored for years, and waiting for some great undertaking, after the nation’s flagship dirigible went down in flames in a horrific 1930 crash in France.

The field mice had the run of the buildings but after the southern shed was renovated in 1994 it was used by occasional rock stars preparing for tours (U2 and Paul McCartney among them) or Hollywood production. The 525-ton door opened for Nolan in 2004. Cardington has since become a special home base, which is fitting given the fact that illusion, extreme architecture, old-school craft and colossal scale are screen trademarks for the London-born filmmaker best known for his three Batman films and “Inception.”

For 2005′s “Batman Begins” they put in the faux masonry of the Narrows and Arkham Asylum. Nolan’s team added to the indoor cityscape for 2008′s billion-dollar hit sequel “The Dark Knight” and then, for the topsy-turvy fights of “Inception,” special-effect guru Chris Corbould built a spinning corridor that made actors like hamsters in a wheel. More recently, Nolan and production designer Nathan Crowley added a cruel and exotic underground prison for “The Dark Knight Rises,” which opens July 20.

 

Keep reading‘Dark Knight Rises’: Christopher Nolan takes Batman to new place

Sweden leads the world in Heavy Metal bands

In Flames

 

Sweden has most heavy metal bands per 100,000 inhabitants. According to Metal-archives.com, it’s Scandinavia in general and Sweden in particular that has the most heavy metal bands in the world. According to their study there are 53.2 metal bands per 100,000 inhabitants in Sweden.

Joacim Cans, singer in the metal band HammerFall, is not surprised. He points at death metal (death metal is an extreme subgenre of heave metal music) and its so-called “Gothenburg sound” as a possible explanation.

Cans believes that bands such as In Flames and Opeth have inspired younger generations of metal musicians to create their own bands. “When a music style becomes world leading, then young people listen and want to do the same thing themselves. It reverberates.”

Cans also believes that the prerequisites for musicians and bands are especially good in Sweden. “In the US it’s very expensive to rent a rehearsal studio. In Sweden we have the municipal school of music, where you can learn to play an instrument at no cost at all.”

via Nordstjernan

 

// Photo via Nirazilla