Get your Masters (Fine Arts) in Paris – low-residency creative writing program from NYU

This sounds like pure torture…

 

The MFA Writers Workshop in Paris constitutes an intimate creative apprenticeship that extends beyond traditional classroom walls.

Over two years, students and faculty convene regularly in Paris for five intensive ten-day residency periods (held biannually in January and July). While in residency in Paris, students participate in a vibrant community engaged in all aspects of the literary arts, including workshops, craft talks, lectures, individual conferences and manuscript consultations, as well as a diverse series of readings, special events and professional development panels. The city of Paris itself—with its storied literary history and rich cultural attractions—provides an ideal opportunity for students to learn the art and craft of writing, immerse themselves in the creative process, and live the writer’s life.

During the intervals between residencies, students pursue focused courses of study, completing reading and writing assignments under the close supervision of individual faculty members. These ongoing dialogues with faculty are tailored to specific student interests and needs; students are mentored by a different professor each term and work closely with four different writers during the two-year program.

Unlike the traditional MFA, the low-residency program offers both freedom and rigor, and provides a productive and inspiring balance between the intense and stimulating community of each residency and the sustained solitary work completed in the intervals between. Students are expected to complete substantial writing and reading assignments each term, regularly submitting packets of work in exchange for detailed feedback and critique. Graduating students leave the program with four new literary mentors and a portfolio of letters written by acclaimed writers in response to their work.

Tuition (per year): $23,000

Housing: up to the individual – “accommodations in Paris are available in a variety of different neighborhoods, configurations and price points. ”

 

Learn more: NYU Creative Writing – Announcing the New Low-Residency MFA Writers Workshop in Paris

 

 

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The Great Gray Female War (for Boomers)

To continue my silvercat journey I’ve found a piece in Time Magazine called the War Over Going Gray. Written by author Anne Kreamer of the book Going Gray, which I hope to read/review.

It points out, among other things, that men prefer women with gray hair…

It Begins

“In 2005, at the age of 48 and practically on a whim, I decided — after nearly a quarter-century of every-three-weeks hair-salon coloring — to buck convention and stop dyeing my hair. And I found to my surprise that by visually challenging my peers (if I was really gray, so must they be!), I unwittingly landed myself on the front lines of a public struggle — literally superficial but at the same time almost existentially meaningful to American women — with the vicissitudes of age.

“Friends and strangers responded to my newly revealed natural hair color in one of two ways: a sort of proud, sometimes sanctimonious right-on-sister enthusiasm from fellow gray-haired women or an equally proud, sometimes resentful don’t-judge-my-choices-I-do-this-to-feel-good-about-me defensiveness in the comments of the committed-to-dyeing cohort. Hardly anyone was lukewarm in their reactions, which suggests to me we may have a contentious new baby-boomer argument over gray hair that is as mutually judgmental as the mommy wars between working and stay-at-home mothers was in the 1980s and ’90s.

They say it’s for work…

“…most baby-boomer women have held on to the hedonistic forever-young part of their Woodstock dreams a lot more tenaciously than to the open-and-honest part.

“And in doing so, they have presided over a narrowing of the range of acceptable looks for women. Women may be CEOs, Cabinet officers and TV-news anchors and may openly indulge their sexual appetites — but only if they appear eternally youthful. And a main requirement is a hair color other than gray or white.

“Ironically, it’s feminism’s success that has driven today’s widespread, virtually obligatory camouflage of gray hair…women in all kinds of professions report feeling similar pressure.

But, it’s really a personal choice

“Interestingly, women apparently aren’t as fearful of the negative professional implications of gray as the personal ones. Clairol research reports that the 71% of women who dye their hair do so in order to “look and feel more attractive.”

“I assumed that if I accurately reported my age and posted first a photo of myself with gray hair and then, three months later, the same image with brown hair, that the photo with brown hair would be deemed more attractive by more of the Match.com men.

“I couldn’t have been more wrong. Among Match.com-ers in New York City, Chicago and — most shocking of all — Los Angeles, three times as many men were interested in going out with me when my hair was gray as when it was dyed. This blew my mind.

Gray hair – in search of the Silvercat

I’m fascinated by the absence of gray hair in my life. As a ‘male’ youth of the feminist movement I have continually had women in positions of authority over me. There have only been a few male bosses who were worth their weight, while the females overwhelmingly dominate every aspect of my life.

In many ways I have come to expect this continual mentoring and guidance from women. Which is why it is all the more shocking for me to find this chinc in their armor: gray hair.

Among the 100 most powerful women on Forbes list only four of them have natural hair, even though all of them are at the age where gray hair sets in. I don’t know what to make of this. My idols have dropped the ball on this one and I am left to fend for myself.

Join me as I explore this trend and try to discover the truth of the situation and where I fit into all of it.

 

Next: The Great Gray Female War (for Boomers)