Tag Archives: directing

Have you seen Sneakers? – The classic spy thriller starring Robert Redford

I can’t imagine a better way to introduce the movie, Sneakers:

It’s hard for me to choose a favorite Sneakers character—there so many great ones. Even the movie’s secondary players are rendered in just enough detail to give them dimension: I love the pretentiousness of Janek, the mathematician who builds the decryption device; the unctuousness (want a cappuccino?) of Dick Gordon, the mustachioed Cosmo crony; and the boorishness of Dr. Werner Brandes, played to the hilt by the always excellent Stephen Tobolowsky.

But even that does not go far enough. Robert Redford plays his role superbly, rivaling and surpassing George Clooney in Oceans Eleven. Then there is the blind man who solves puzzles, River Phoenix as the shy computer genius, Sidney Poitier as a former-CIA agent, and who can forget Dan Aykroyd’s conspiracy theories?

If this interests you a little, if you like Oceans Eleven and caper films, or delight in well written, directed, and acted films then I demand you go see this movie . You won’t be disappointed. If you are, come back and yell at me, I’m that confident of success.

Sneakers is a true delight and you will be an admirer within the first quietly suspenseful minutes.

And if you’re obsession goes a bit deeper, here is Slate’s compulsive coverage of the movie’s 20th anniversary:

And, listen them discuss it in the Gabfest (the 2nd topic).

Joss Whedon on Directing movies like they’re a Comic Book

“As much as anything, my visual style as a director comes from comic books,” he says. “My understanding of visual storytelling comes from panel art, which I was reading more voraciously than I was watching movies for most of my childhood. In that sense, I had sort of a head start when I started visualizing this film.

“Visually, the movie is similar to a lot of things that I do because it’s supposed to be casually iconic. In other words, I want to hit iconic moments without hitting people over the head with them. I want it to feel like a comic book without trying to look like one.”

“I feel respect for the fans, but you can’t let yourself feel the weight of how much they want or need from the project,” Whedon explains. “I really believe that you can die from fan expectations. There are two things that I can’t stand when I go to see a movie based on a comic book: being ignored and being pandered to. Fans are well aware when movies are doing either one.”

“There won’t be a hint of, ‘Well, we thought we ought to put this in to make the fans happy.’

Whedon concludes, “I want to make a great Super Hero movie. I want to make the kind of movie that inspires people to say, ‘There should be more movies with Super Heroes in them.’”

via ComicBookMovie.com