The most common ways a dog will get injured – while adventuring with you

Ski edges (11%): Avoid slicing your dog by bringing it only when you cross-country or skate-ski. (Most nordic skis don’t have edges.)

Poisonous plants (11%): Dogs that forage aren’t getting a proper diet. Feed your dog grain-free dog food (no corn or gluten). It’s more expensive but healthier.

Cars (18%): Use rewards to train Fido to do two things—to come when called and to heel on command, especially at trailheads and intersections. If your dog is at heel and you stop, it should stop, too.

Exercise injury (29%): To avoid ACL tears and other mishaps, feed puppies food with a protein-to-fat ratio of about two to one, for bone and joint development, and keep hikes longer than two miles to a minimum.

Dogfights (19%): Get your puppy used to unfamiliar dogs. Talk to and shake hands with another dog’s owner, demonstrating that the two of you are in charge, then tell your dog, “Go say hello.”

 

Source: Outside Magazine – The Ultimate Outdoor Companion (w/ adventure training, adventure breeds, and more)

 

 

Continue reading The most common ways a dog will get injured – while adventuring with you

Hollywood Dogs – from Rin Tin Tin to Uggie

Featuring author Susan Orlean, animal trainers Sarah Clifford and Omar von Muller and a screening of “Clash of the Wolves” (1925) starring Rin Tin Tin, with live musical accompaniment by Michael Mortilla.

“Man’s Best Friend” has gotten a wonderful publicity boost from the movies. Canine cinema mythology has enhanced human appreciation of a dog’s loyalty, heroism, humor and intelligence from the earliest days of film with such immediate audience favorites as “Rescued by Rover” (1905) and “The Whole Dam Family and the Dam Dog” (1905).

More than any other four-legged actor, the dog has achieved a unique stardom with such long-lasting box office stars as Strongheart, Teddy, Lassie, Pete the Pup, Benji and particularly Rin Tin Tin. The original Rinty (there would be several over the years) was rescued in Germany during World War I by a U.S. soldier who would mold him for Hollywood stardom, resulting in his becoming one of the biggest box office draws of the late 1920s. The popularity of Rinty’s films would practically underwrite a struggling studio known as Warner Bros. and afford a young writer named Darryl F. Zanuck some of his earliest success.

Join Susan Orlean, author of The Orchid Thief and Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend, for an evening of photographs, film clips, behind-the-scenes secrets and surprises featuring more dogs than you can throw a stick for. No pawtographs, please!

Event Information

Wednesday, June 6 at 7:30 p.m.
Samuel Goldwyn Theater
8949 Wilshire Boulevard – Beverly Hills, CA 90211
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Ticketed seating is unreserved.

Tickets

$5 general admission/$3 for Academy members and students with a valid ID (limit 2 at the discounted price) – Tickets

via Oscars.org