Modern world: Bookstores with cafés increase sales – those without decrease

As Independent Booksellers Week gets into full swing, the Booksellers Association has released figures to suggest outlets with cafés are likely to have higher sales than those without.

Figures based on a survey of 40 BA members reveal that bookshops with cafés saw a 3% growth in overall turnover in 2011, whereas those without experienced a decline in sales of 5.2%. Those bookshops with cafés also experienced a 2% hike in their book sales last year, in comparison to those without cafés which had a decrease in book sales of 4%.

“We want customers to celebrate their local bookshop and also we want consumers to vote with their feet and use their local bookshop or risk losing it.  Bookshops are social and cultural hubs and provide far more to communities than books and as such deserve and require strong action to preserve their unique role in British life.”

 

Source: The Bookseller – Sales higher in bookshops with cafés

 

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Hollywood Dogs – from Rin Tin Tin to Uggie

Featuring author Susan Orlean, animal trainers Sarah Clifford and Omar von Muller and a screening of “Clash of the Wolves” (1925) starring Rin Tin Tin, with live musical accompaniment by Michael Mortilla.

“Man’s Best Friend” has gotten a wonderful publicity boost from the movies. Canine cinema mythology has enhanced human appreciation of a dog’s loyalty, heroism, humor and intelligence from the earliest days of film with such immediate audience favorites as “Rescued by Rover” (1905) and “The Whole Dam Family and the Dam Dog” (1905).

More than any other four-legged actor, the dog has achieved a unique stardom with such long-lasting box office stars as Strongheart, Teddy, Lassie, Pete the Pup, Benji and particularly Rin Tin Tin. The original Rinty (there would be several over the years) was rescued in Germany during World War I by a U.S. soldier who would mold him for Hollywood stardom, resulting in his becoming one of the biggest box office draws of the late 1920s. The popularity of Rinty’s films would practically underwrite a struggling studio known as Warner Bros. and afford a young writer named Darryl F. Zanuck some of his earliest success.

Join Susan Orlean, author of The Orchid Thief and Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend, for an evening of photographs, film clips, behind-the-scenes secrets and surprises featuring more dogs than you can throw a stick for. No pawtographs, please!

Event Information

Wednesday, June 6 at 7:30 p.m.
Samuel Goldwyn Theater
8949 Wilshire Boulevard – Beverly Hills, CA 90211
Doors open at 6:30 p.m.
Ticketed seating is unreserved.

Tickets

$5 general admission/$3 for Academy members and students with a valid ID (limit 2 at the discounted price) – Tickets

via Oscars.org