Tag Archives: jet propulsion laboratory

Monitor global warming in real-time with new iPhone, Android app

Want to monitor the vital signs of planet Earth? View global warming trends, like ozone, CO2, and sea levels, on a 3D globe? Scan satellite data in real-time?

There’s an app for that. It’s called Earth Now and is available on both iPhone and Android.

Released by NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory “to drive up excitement for their projects and put scientific data in the palm of anyone’s hand,” according to Pasadena Star-News.

If this interests you, there are 10 more smartphone apps from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

And many thanks to Max Huijgen for sharing this story.

 

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Ray Bradbury reads his poem – “If Only We Had Taller Been” (1971)

Sci-fi author Ray Bradbury reads his space travel-themed poem “If Only We Had Taller Been” in this 1971 video posted yesterday by the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

Also in the scene are Arthur C. Clarke, Walter Sullivan, Carl Sagan and Bruce Murray

 

“hoping an inch of good is worth a pound of years”

 

// Thx – Laughing Squid

NASA completely hacked, several times in cyber war

NASA said hackers broke into its computer systems 13 times last year, stealing employee credentials and gaining access to mission-critical projects in breaches that could compromise U.S. national security.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration spends only $58 million of its $1.5 billion annual IT budget on cyber security, Paul Martin, the agency’s inspector general, told a Congressional panel on NASA security earlier this week.

“Some NASA systems house sensitive information which, if lost or stolen, could result in significant financial loss, adversely affect national security, or significantly impair our nation’s competitive technological advantage,”

He said the agency discovered in November that hackers working through a Chinese-based IP address broke into the network of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

He said they gained full system access, which allowed them to modify, copy, or delete sensitive files.

Unencrypted notebook computers that have been lost or stolen include ones containing codes for controlling the International Space Station as well as sensitive data on NASA’s Constellation and Orion programs and Social Security numbers, Martin said.

via Reuters