Tag Archives: geography

Great maps of the Native American Tribes of North America

The other day I found this map in Facebook, covering the major linguistic groups of the North America. Attached to it was question, “Why isn’t this in any of our history books?”

It received 3,800 likes and over 5,000 shares.

Clearly, it hit a nerve with many people, after all it isn’t that high quality of an image. It definitely caught my attention and so I wanted to write about the native people of North America. I’m not an expert so instead I will just pull together some interesting maps and links for you to expand your knowledge.

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Students create their own composting program in the dorms

Hauling trash-bags full of coffee grounds and kitchen scraps, two three-wheeled rickshaw bicycles raced past campus foot traffic.

The fleet had just finished their first compost pickup.

The owner of the cafe, Devon Jackson-Kali, met the students near the cafe to give them leftover coffee grounds…he also gave them pounds of cabbage heads, carrot peelings, celery and other scraps leftover from his kitchen operations.

Leaders of an undergraduate environmental research team known as Waste Watchers drove the custom-built, electric and pedal-operated bikes – or rickshaws – on an extended campus route for the first time. Using the rickshaws for transport, the team collects and recycles leftover scraps at their own compost site located in Sunset Canyon Recreation Center.

Chloe Green, the Weyburn project coordinator and a graduate student in urban planning, excitedly greeted the team on the street outside her apartment Wednesday.

Green said it felt “unnatural” not to compost at her Weyburn apartment. She grew up composting and said she has since learned the technique through trial and error.

 

More on this – Daily Bruin: Compost crew: Waste Watchers turn trash into fertilizer by properly disposing organic waste

 

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So how many continents are there?

Last week I mentioned that CreativeMornings is now on 6 continents, which caused a bit of confusion over how many continents there are.

What I’ve since learned is that there are in fact different models being taught around the world. The seven-continent model is usually taught in China, India and most English-speaking countries. The six-continent combined-Eurasia model is sometimes preferred in the former states of the USSR and Japan. The six-continent combined-America model is taught in Latin America and in some parts of Europe including Greece, Portugal and Spain.

via Swiss Miss

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Technically, there are 4 distinct land masses (continents), but if you count the Suez and Panama canals as separating the land masses, then you have 6, and, finally, if you want to separate Europe from Asia with an arbitrary line you get to 7. – Wikipedia