Most of us would probably survive a nuclear blast in Washington D.C.

It’s the most nightmarish scenario—a nuclear device being detonated in downtown Washington.

Whammo and good night, right?

For most of us, actually, that wouldn’t be the case, according to a recent study by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. The 120-page report, “Key Response Planning Factors for the Aftermath of Nuclear Terrorism,” was released last November.

The FEMA report posits a detonation a few blocks from the White House. Everything within a half-mile radius would be reduced to rubble and be so irradiated as to make any rescue operations unfeasible. Between half a mile and one mile out, there would still be significant damage and heavy injuries, but the area would be approachable by emergency responders.

And further out, there would just be a lot of broken glass from windows shattered by the force of the explosion, but few, if any, injuries that would require medical attention. (Aside from those sustained by people running face first into their bursting windows when they try to look outside to see what is happening.)

So, good chance of injury, temporary blindness, destroyed hospitals and a massive fallout cloud—but more likely than not, you’d live. At least until the radiation settles in.

 

via DCist – **click for the full report and much more gruesome details**

 

Thx to Shevonne Polastre

 

// Photo – James Nash

Kim Jong Un makes his first deal – halts nuclear program for food aid

North Korea’s offer to suspend uranium enrichment and allow international inspectors into the country breaks an impasse over its nuclear program…

The announcement marks the first agreement between the United States and North Korea since February 2007, when Pyongyang agreed to begin disabling its nuclear complex in return for $400 million worth of fuel oil and aid. The deal fell apart the following year, and North Korea, complaining the United States had not followed through on promises, resumed processing plutonium.

U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton described the agreement as “important but limited.” She said Washington “still has profound concerns” about Pyongyang’s pursuit of nuclear weapons and will watch to see if the regime adheres to its promises.

Former U.S. officials describe the agreement as worthwhile because it promises to interrupt North Korea’s nuclear program, if only temporarily. It also provides a test of the new regime’s intentions and trustworthiness.

The U.S. Agency for International Development tentatively plans to deliver about 20,000 metric tons of food a month over the next year, officials said. The food is appropriate for infants, small children and pregnant women. (The deal) also includes an increase in cultural, educational and sports exchanges.

via LA Times

 

For more history on North Korea, including two nuclear bomb detonations in 2006 and 2009, read about Korean Unification.