Rain barrels conserve water, protect the environment, and keep our oceans/rivers clean

Why rain barrels?

Placed under a down spout, rain barrels conveniently collect rainwater that can be used to water gardens and lawns, wash cars or even fill birdbaths and ponds. A 1000 square foot roof yields about 600 gallons per inch of rainfall – that’s a lot of water (and money) to be saved. Rain barrels can also be hooked up to a soaker hose for easy and free garden watering.

In coastal areas, additional benefits include diverting of water from municipal storm drain systems and protecting the ocean from storm runoff pollution.

Installation can be very easy, placing the barrel under your gutter’s down spout. Conversion kits also offer a diverter system which eliminates the need for cutting off gutter downspouts or installing over-flow valves, and eliminates potential for mosquito breeding.

Most cities offer rain barrels for sale at a discount. Check out your local city website to see if they offer a similar program.

Continue reading Rain barrels conserve water, protect the environment, and keep our oceans/rivers clean

Los Angeles leads California and the nation in water conservation

Los Angeles is not only top in California, but also leads the nation’s large cities in water conservation. Since June 2009, when Mandatory Water Conservation took effect in the City of Los Angeles, Angelenos have saved more than 75 billion gallons – more than one-third of what Los Angeles uses in one year.

Water use in Los Angeles has fallen to 1970s levels, despite a population increase of more than 1 million. In fiscal year 2010-2011, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power customers used an average of 117 gallons of water per person daily – the lowest among the nine U.S. cities with populations over one million.

“Angelenos have embraced water conservation as a way of life and are not only leaders in California, but across the nation. Four years ago, critics said LA couldn’t achieve further water savings, but incentives combined with strong policies, public awareness and a strong response by our customers has led to the lowest water use by our customers ever recorded.”

“Water conservation is the best source of water supply” said Ronald Nichols, General Manager of LADWP. “These reductions in water use result in lower imports of water to Los Angeles. It saves our customers money; it reduces risk of uncertainty of availability of imported water supply sources, and is the most environmentally sustainable means to meet the total water supply needs of Angelenos.”

via Sierra Club

 

Los Angeles is also second in the state for solar power.