The first university-run channel on YouTube – original content just got smarter

On March 1, University of California Television (UCTV) will launch a new YouTube original channel, UCTV Prime, the first university-run channel to be included among YouTube’s new production partnerships with such recognizable brands as the Wall Street Journal, Madonna and TED.

Each week, UCTV Prime will debut 15 minutes of fresh content.

The channel’s inaugural effort, the first installment of a four-part documentary mini-series called “Naked Art,” which explores UC’s preeminent art collections.

via UCLA Today

Reflections on the diverse definitions, purposes and modes of public art from UC campuses and elsewhere, including comments by artists, curators, students and other participants.

 

The featured playlists so far are:

  • Science
  • Health/Medicine
  • Explorations in Art
  • Election Analysis
  • Research Developments

Watch more at www.youtube.com/uctvprime and www.uctv.tv/prime.

UCLA turns to social media as a means of researching the Middle East

I love that they are calling the project the “International Digitizing Ephemera Project.”

Ephemera – (1) something of no lasting significance, or (2) paper items that were originally meant to be discarded after use but have since become collectibles.

 

The UCLA Library announced last month a new project aimed at recording and cataloging all relevant forms of social media and photographs involving the Arab Spring, a wave of protests and demonstrations that have swept through the Middle East and North Africa over the past year.

(The project) is largely funded by a $3.4 million donation from the Arcadia Fund, an organization that supports preservation and digitization projects. Libraries apply for grants from the fund and receive money based on the scope of their work.

“The shelf life of these materials is not very long, so it is important that we start our work while the events are taking place, enabling us to have a greater database available to us,” said Todd Grappone, associate university librarian for Digital Initiatives and Information Technology at UCLA.

Data will be collected from verified sources, such as the Twitter accounts of journalists in the region, and stored according to their content and subject matter.

Projects like this are important for scholarship, she said, because they reflect a trend toward the use of digital media as a means of research for current affairs in the Middle East.

via Daily Bruin

The long-term unemployed make up half of those unemployed

4 important facts about unemployment from economist Lee Ohanian:

  • The economy should be creating 500,000 jobs/month, instead of 200,000.
  • Long-term unemployed makes up half of those unemployed, and they have little or no value in our economy.
  • The retirement age is certainly going to rise.
  • Those with only a high school degree or less are not competitive in the global economy.

 

More than 200,000 new jobs were created in January, 2012. What do you make of the pace of job growth?

The major puzzle about the U.S. economy has been the remarkably slow job growth. The U.S. economy should be creating about 500,000 jobs per month now, given high worker productivity, the large pool of available workers and the fairly high level of corporate profits. While 200,000 jobs sounds really positive, it is only about half of what we should be seeing.

The long-term unemployed — those who have been out of work for more than six months. It seems that new jobs are going to people who have just entered the workforce or to those who were unemployed for a short time. What’s going on here?

Long-term unemployment is at a record level of nearly 50 percent of the unemployed. The market value of these workers is very low, because many simply don’t have the specific skills required to compete in today’s economy. It becomes the problem of retraining construction workers to become health care workers. It can’t be done overnight, but this process needs to move forward. Those construction jobs aren’t coming back anytime soon. Reforming unemployment insurance to include retraining funding would be useful.

What is your view on the retirement age in the U.S.? Is it too low, too high or just right?

The retirement age is now, depending on what year you were born, between 65 and 67 for full benefits. This will almost certainly rise in response to dealing with the upcoming shortfall in Social Security associated with baby boomers [more than 70 million of them ] who are now approaching retirement. The aging of the baby boom cohort will increase the share of the population who is 65 and older from its current level of 13 percent to about 19 percent of the population. This will put enormous pressure on the underfunded Social Security system — so get ready for a gradual increase in the full retirement age.

How has unemployment differentially impacted workers?

Education level is a major differentiator. Workers with high levels of education and training — those with bachelor’s degrees and beyond — have very low unemployment rates, about 4 percent. In contrast, those with no post-high-school education and very young workers have unemployment rates of more than 20 percent. The message is very clear: A good career starts with a solid education that includes training beyond high school.

Low-skilled and unskilled workers were hit very hard by the recession and continue to suffer. Is anything going to change for them?

This again points to education. Many of these unemployed have only a high school degree or never graduated from high school. These workers are, for the most part, no longer competitive in the global economy. Many may not be competitive even at current minimum wages, and some probably wouldn’t work for minimum wages. Fundamentally, they need to retrain in order to successfully re-engage in the labor market.

Most championships in NCAA history – the top 10 universities

Total NCAA Championships through January 8, 2012

 

School  –  (Division)

 

Total Team Titles

  1. UCLA (I) – 108
  2. Stanford (I) – 102
  3. USC (I) – 94
  4. Abilene Christian (II) & Kenyon (III) – 57
  5. Oklahoma St. (I) – 50
  6. LSU (I) – 42
  7. Arkansas (I) – 41
  8. Penn St. (I) & Texas (I) – 40

 

Total Individual Titles

  1. Kenyon (III) – 506
  2. Stanford (I) – 439
  3. USC (I) – 363
  4. Abilene Christian (II) – 313
  5. Texas (I) – 310
  6. Michigan (I) – 290
  7. UCLA (I) – 262
  8. St. Augustine’s (II) – 238
  9. Ohio St. (I) – 228
  10. Florida (I) – 220

New book chronicles the history of UCLA from farmland to world-class public research university

Of the many photographs in a new history of UCLA, one is especially arresting. The photo, from April 1929, shows the school’s first four buildings on its soon-to-open Westwood campus with little else around for miles but rolling hills and a few  houses. “The campus is so far out in the country that it’s obvious only farmers will ever be the students’ neighbors,” the caption reads, quoting a not-particularly-far-sighted journalist at the time.

Clearly, the growth of UCLA and surrounding Westside neighborhoods was never a given. The school’s unusual journey to academic prominence — with political intrigue and student unrest along the way — is the basic narrative of “UCLA: The First Century,” a lavish 360-page coffee table book by Marina Dundjerski.

Pushing against the Berkeley-centric education establishment, Southern Californians undertook…

read – 100 years of UCLA on your coffee table

UCLA in 1929

 

Learn more about the book, UCLA: The First Centuryand about the UCLA History Project.

Who makes more, college professors or coaches?

I bet you’re thinking this is a no-brainer and the coaches win by far. Not so fast, the medical departments at colleges rake in money for patient care and consulting.

Here is a breakdown for the UC system in California which includes Berkeley, UCLA, and San Francisco with a combined 100+ Nobel Laureates:

2010 Pay

  1. Coach – $2.4 million – Jeff Tedford (Berekeley)
  2. Coach – $2.1 million – Ben Howland (UCLA)
  3. Prof. – $2.0 million – Ronald Busuttil (UCLA)
  4. Coach – $1.9 million – Mike Montgomery (Berkeley)
  5. Prof. – $1.8 million – Khalil Tabsh (UCLA)
  6. Prof. – $1.5 million – Anthony Azakie (UCSF)
  7. Prof. – $1.5 million – Philip Leboit (UCSF)
  8. Prof. – $1.5 million – Timothy McCalmont (UCSF)
  9. Prof. – $1.4 million – Richard Shemin  (UCLA)
  10. Coach – $1.2 million – Rick Neuheisel (UCLA)

The coaches hold four of the ten spots. The disparity in pay between the two groups isn’t all that great either. Average of the top 10 has the professors earning $1.6 million and the coaches earning $1.9 million.

If you keep going, the next fifteen are all on the healthcare side with twelve professors and three health executives. Of the top 100 they take up 84 spots, with only fourteen non-healthcare salaries.

#3 - Ronald Busuttil, Transplant Surgeon

It’s also worth noting that the next coaches on the list are Norm Chow (UCLA) at #95, and Joanne Boyle (Berkeley) at #119.

I have to admit the numbers are pretty shocking. The common understanding is that professors make little money, while doctors make good money. Combine the two and it’s a gold mine.

One that doesn’t pull money from the schools themselves. Like the coaches they are largely paid with the money they pull in. In the world of college academics this is called an “auxiliary program” (thanks Norman), and the opposite is normally true. These programs (sports, healthcare) funnel money, prestige, and students to the schools.

A final note, these salaries are determined by combining each persons base pay with their incentives and bonuses. For the coaches this means winning, playoffs, and championships. For the health professors it means seeing patients and receiving awards for their research.

Take out this extra pay and not one in the top 10 earns above $317,000 in base pay. Many of those lower on the list have a set base pay of $500,000 and $800,000.

Interesting, to say the least, and I hope I informed your opinion of college salaries.

Entrance to UCLA Medical Center (only 20% of the whole complex)

****

Information pulled from the OC Register article: UC coaches’ pay outstrips Nobel laureates’

Photo of Jeff Tedford by Avinash & of the UCLA Medical Center by Benny Chan

Jerry Rice Jr. at UCLA

Sean Ceglinsky over at CBS Sports wrote an interesting article on UCLA’s receiver of the future, Jerry Rice Jr.

The son of hall of famer, Jerry Rice, who is widely considered the best receiver of all time, faces many of the same obstacles as his dad.

He is small, 5-foot-10, 185-pounds, and underrated which means he will have to overcome by sure willpower.

[testimonial]”Every time I get a chance, I try to make a play, that’s the way I was raised,” Rice Jr. said. “I’m out there competing, all of us receivers here at UCLA are pushing each other and we’re getting better as a group. Anything can happen in this game, so I’m always ready to play. My goal is to keep my head up and keep grinding. My time will come if I keep working hard.”[/testimonial]

That time may be a ways off considering there are 7 receivers ahead of him.

UCLA has always been at the top of the class in recruiting talented wide receivers. This year is no different with 3 returning seniors, 2 juniors, and 2 sophomores, including Shaquelle Evans, a top prospect transferring to UCLA.

Still, he has skills.

[testimonial]”Come on Jerry, make a play,” Neuheisel shouts toward the underclassman.

He uses a quick stutter step at the line of scrimmage to create some much-needed separation from the cornerback. A head-and-shoulders fake freezes the linebacker at the second level. An uncanny burst of speed follows as he blows by the safety. Seconds later, Rice Jr. is in the end zone, snatching the pass out of mid-air while keeping both feet in bounds for a touchdown.[/testimonial]

If you read the full article, Jerry Rice Jr. is intent on carving his own path at UCLA, you get the sense that Junior is a superstar waiting to happen.

Here’s to hoping for him to have a stellar career at UCLA!

UCLA Football 2011 Schedule

**Update: 2012 UCLA Football Schedule is available.

 
Training camp starts in just a few days on August 8.

This year the Bruins return a ton of starters (offense-seven, defense-eight) but the question is, as always, the quarterback.

Kevin Prince is set to start and then get injured, so Patrick Brehaut or Brett Hundley will get a chance.

Here is the full schedule, including available TV listings, but the weird thing is all the later games have no set time yet.

2011 UCLA Football Schedule

Saturday, Sept 3
6:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Houston

Saturday, Sept 10
7:00 PM PT (FSN)
vs San Jose State

Saturday, Sept 17
12:30 PM PT (ABC)
vs Texas

Saturday, Sept 24
12:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Oregon State

Saturday, Oct 1
7:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Stanford

Saturday, Oct 8
7:30 PM PT (FSN)
vs Washington State

Thursday, Oct 20
6 PM PT (ESPN)
@ Arizona

Saturday, Oct 29
4 PM PT (FSN)
vs California

Saturday, Nov 5
4:30 PM PT (Versus)
vs Arizona State

Saturday, Nov 12
3:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Utah

Saturday, Nov 19
4:30pm PT (Versus)
vs Colorado

Saturday, Nov 26
7:00 PM PT (FSN)
@ USC

Pac-12 Championship Game
Friday, Dec 2
5:00 PM PT (Fox)
@ Oregon

Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl
Saturday, Dec 31
12:30 PM PT (ESPN)
vs. Illinois