Tag Archives: nintendo

Nintendo’s next console – Wii U – to launch November 18, 2012

After the success of the Wii, Nintendo is pushing ahead with its next generation console on November 18, 2012. This one is more iPad-like with a 6.2 inch touchscreen built into the GamePad controllers, and that is driving up the price compared to the Wii at $200.

From The Verge:

The console will launch in two varieties: The $299.99 “Basic” version, which includes a white, 8GB Wii U console, a gamepad, AC adapters, a sensor bar, and an HDMI Cable. The $349.99 Deluxe edition includes all of that in a black, 32GB console, with charging cradles and a free copy of Nintendoland.

 

This GamePad should make or break the console. It has a ton of features “motion control, a front-facing camera, a microphone, stereo speakers, rumble features, a sensor bar, a stylus, and support for Near Field Communication (NFC).” But it seems bulky:

Are those kids hands?

 

And you can see the console itself (under the TV) is actually smaller the GamePad. Still, it only weighs 1.1 pounds and allows for some interesting game features (note the map on the GamePad screen above). Maybe Nintendo will surprise us all again, like they did with the Wii.

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Star Wars R2-D2 Bra – and more handpainted geek bras

These beauties are handpainted, permanent and washable. And very popular. I’m not even going to say guys buy these for your ladies, because I know there are plenty of geek girls out there. They will buy it for themselves!

I included a few delicates, visit the full site on Etsy for all of them.

 

Thx Florian!

R2-D2 Bra

 

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The Museum of Endangered Sounds – Nintendo, VCR, payphone, cassette tape

This site is archiving the electronic sounds of the past, and it’s awesome

The site archives a few sounds that might have you nostalgically playing them over and over again. There’s everything from the sound of dialing a rotary telephone to the sound of a floppy drive chugging away. If nothing else, listening to the sound of a screeching modem kicking into high gear will make you eternally grateful for your 24 hour broadband connection.

I love this idea!

The Museum of Endangered Sounds

 

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Video games wasted about 1% of America’s electrical energy

A new study from Carnegie Mellon University found that in 2010, video games wasted about 1% of America’s electrical energy.

They found that up to 75% of energy consumed by video game consoles is during idle use, because the machines don’t have an auto-power-down feature (like every computer does).

The authors of the study say the cost of implementing this feature is marginal and would save more than $1 billion in utility costs.

More details:

- By the end of 2010, over 75 million current generation video game consoles (Microsoft Xbox 360, Nintendo Wii, and Sony PlayStation 3) had been sold, meaning that many homes have two or more current generation game consoles

- We estimate that the total electricity consumption of video game consoles in the US was around 11 TWh in 2007 and 16 TWh in 2010 (approximately 1 % of US residential electricity consumption), an increase of almost 50 % in 3 years.

- The most effective energy-saving modification is incorporation of a default auto power down feature, which could reduce electricity consumption of game consoles by 75 % (10 TWh reduction of electricity in 2010).

- A simple improvement that could be implemented now via firmware updates to power the console down after 1 hour of inactivity. Though two of the three current generation consoles have this capability, it is not enabled by default, a modification that would be trivial for console manufacturers.

- Saving consumers over $1 billion annually in electricity bills.

 

Scott Lowe at The Verge points out that in May 2011, Microsoft did update Xbox 360′s firmware to enable auto-power-down by default. Now it’s up to the rest of industry to catch-up.

 

Full study available – Electricity consumption and energy savings potential of video game consoles in the United States

 

// Photo – Jami3.org