Scientists discover the motion of sperm cells using 3-D technology

If nature finds the best way, then move in a spiral pattern to get there the quickest, from the UCLA Newsroom:

The team developed a lensless computational imaging platform that accurately tracked more than 24,000 individual sperm cells in a large volume. This involved observing the individual rotations of each sperm cell, including helical movement patterns, rotation speed, and linear and curved distances traveled.

90% of them move in a right-handed spiral – damn I’m left-handed – and they move fast for microscopic entities, 20-100 micrometers/second.

That’s a big difference in speed…one sperm cell could be 5x faster than his brother.

 

Image demonstrating three-dimensional motion of human sperm cells. (source: UCLA)

What if the world’s greatest works of art, when seen one after another, told a story?

What if the world’s greatest works of art, when seen one after another, told a story? A story of people, places, nature and motion. artCircles from Art.com brings you “Van Gogh to Rothko in 30 Seconds,” an epic journey of discovery through the world’s most inspiring art collection.

 

// Thx to Mara Mascaro

A slow motion video of exploding eggs and smashing glass

A super slow motion video of exploding eggs and smashing glass filmed by the Phantom Flex camera….not your typical tea party.

The frame rate was anywhere between 3,200 to 6,900 frames per second.

Star Wars opening title re-imagined as an animated motion picture

If Star Wars was filmed two decades earlier and Saul Bass did the opening title sequence, it “might” look like this…

Saul Bass (May 8, 1920 – April 25, 1996) was a Jewish-American graphic designer and filmmaker, best known for his design of animated motion picture title sequences.

During his 40-year career Bass worked for some of Hollywood’s greatest filmmakers, including Alfred Hitchcock, Otto Preminger, Stanley Kubrick and Martin Scorsese.

From Wikipedia

and a video response: