Tag Archives: anatomy

Rare drawings of human anatomy from centuries past

A fascinating piece of curation from Brain Pickings. Ten centuries of anatomy drawings covering everything from Civil War wounds to anti-tuberculosis flyers from China.

For the past 175 years, the The National Library of Medicine in Bethesda has been building the world’s largest collection of biomedical images, artifacts, and ephemera. With more than 17 million items spanning ten centuries, it’s a treasure trove of rare, obscure, extravagant wonders, most of which remain unseen by the public and unknown even to historians, librarians, and curators. Until now.

 

In the new book called Hidden Treasure. Several images from it were reproduced in the blog post, 10 Centuries of Visualizing the Body in Rare Archival Images.

I chose two to give you a taste: the first is an early sketch of our skeleton and muscles, the second is a Civil War-era surgical card.

The snapshots:

 

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Epic Photo: the anatomy of the Incredible Hulk

click for full size image (and then zoom to read text)

 

I drew this fan art of Marvel Comics’ Incredible Hulk, dissected and analyzed. Here it is with a new lick of paint.

At the time, I tried to draw on not only my mother’s nursing school anatomy textbooks, but also gorilla and hominid ancestor skulls (such as Paranthropus, though my murky text identifies it with the outdated Zinjanthropus name), inspiration for things like the cranial ridge and large jaw muscles. I included details such as 3 scars on the bone (I’m Canadian: Wolverine wrecked his face a few times and I wanted to document that) and perfect glowing teeth. If anyone has perfect shiny teeth, it needs to be Hulk.

via Scientific American

Surfline gives a science lesson – The Anatomy of a Swell

Welcome to the first episode of “Anatomy of a Swell“, Surfline’s new series that dissects the science of swell events and brings the very best footage and photos to your computer, smart phone, or tablet. Our team of forecasters and scientists will break down all you could possibly want to know about a swell, including the three main meteorological ingredients that lead to significant swell events:

The storm’s size, movement, and wind.

 

Told in a slide show of 29 photos. Here is #3:

 

Take the lesson – Anatomy of a Swell