Week in Review: Chewie Dog, Surfing, Allure of the older man, MTV, & Spotify


This week was an interesting week of random pop culture. You can definitely tell its summer time when all we have on our minds are fun, music, and outdoors!

Most Epic Photos: The Chewie Dog

US Open of Surfing: Top Events

Is the Allure of the “Older Man” Fading?

Most Epic Photos: Man on the moon (with MTV)

Need a Spotify invite?

New music, surf film: Billabong Blowup (plus soundtrack)

Week in Review: Chewie Dog, Surfing, Allure of the older man, MTV, & Spotify


This week was an interesting week of random pop culture. You can definitely tell its summer time when all we have on our minds are fun, music, and outdoors!

Most Epic Photos: The Chewie Dog

US Open of Surfing: Top Events

Is the Allure of the “Older Man” Fading?

Most Epic Photos: Man on the moon (with MTV)

Need a Spotify invite?

New music, surf film: Billabong Blowup (plus soundtrack)

The seal looked just like a man

…and it freaked me out!

No kidding. I’m sitting in the water and I turn around: there are two human-looking heads staring right at me. Their heads are smooth like slicked back hair. I blink once, twice and then it occurs to me…they’re not human.

Yet we are still staring at each other. It’s one of those moments where wildlife meets human life and time stands still. We share the same thought and emotion…a “what the hell are you doing here!” moment.

Then I panic and take the next wave coming at me. As I ride down, I see them disappear underwater. Thoughts of seal attacks flood my brain even though there is no reason for a seal to attack me.

In a few moments I’m on the shore and the panic subsides. I feel like a big fool 🙂

from a 1936 publication:

The Harbour Seal is a very intelligent animal, and when alarmed, it has a curious habit of standing upright, with its head just above the water, in order to take observations. At such times its appearance is singularly like that of a man, and it is quite probable that the old legends of mermaids and mermen arose from seeing Seals in this position. The eyes are large, very full, and dark in colour, and the animal has an unexplained habit of opening and closing its nostrils.

Most Epic Photos: Tank Man

from Wikipedia

The incident took place near Tiananmen on Chang’an Avenue, which runs east-west along the south end of the Forbidden City in Beijing, on June 5, 1989, one day after the Chinese government’s violent crackdown on the Tiananmen protests.

The man placed himself alone in the middle of the street as the tanks approached, directly in the path of the armored vehicles. He held two shopping bags, one in each hand. As the tanks came to a stop, the man gestured towards the tanks with his bags.

In response, the lead tank attempted to drive around the man, but the man repeatedly stepped into the path of the tank in a show of nonviolent action.

After repeatedly attempting to go around rather than crush the man, the lead tank stopped its engines, and the armored vehicles behind it seemed to follow suit. There was a pause for a short period of time with the man and the tanks having reached a quiet, still impasse.

Having successfully brought the column to a halt, the man climbed onto the hull of the buttoned-up lead tank and, after briefly stopping at the driver’s hatch, appeared in video footage of the incident to call into various ports in the tank’s turret.

He then climbed atop the turret and seemed to have a short conversation with a crew member at the gunner’s hatch. After ending the conversation, the man alighted from the tank. The tank commander briefly emerged from his hatch, and the tanks restarted their engines, ready to continue on.

At that point, the man, who was still standing within a meter or two from the side of the lead tank, leapt in front of the vehicle once again and quickly reestablished the man–tank standoff.

Video footage shows that two figures in blue attire then pulled the man away and disappeared with him into a nearby crowd; the tanks continued on their way. Eyewitnesses disagree about the identity of the people who pulled him aside. Jan Wong is convinced the group were concerned citizens helping him away.

showing his hesitation...I think the full video shows a man angry in a momentary rage, not sure of how far to push things..what do you think?

The Video

Etc.

YouTube also features a documentary on this moment, check out the playlist.

A lego recreation from Flickr user Balakov

Modern day Tiananmen Square

UCLA Football 2011 Schedule

**Update: 2012 UCLA Football Schedule is available.

 
Training camp starts in just a few days on August 8.

This year the Bruins return a ton of starters (offense-seven, defense-eight) but the question is, as always, the quarterback.

Kevin Prince is set to start and then get injured, so Patrick Brehaut or Brett Hundley will get a chance.

Here is the full schedule, including available TV listings, but the weird thing is all the later games have no set time yet.

2011 UCLA Football Schedule

Saturday, Sept 3
6:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Houston

Saturday, Sept 10
7:00 PM PT (FSN)
vs San Jose State

Saturday, Sept 17
12:30 PM PT (ABC)
vs Texas

Saturday, Sept 24
12:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Oregon State

Saturday, Oct 1
7:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Stanford

Saturday, Oct 8
7:30 PM PT (FSN)
vs Washington State

Thursday, Oct 20
6 PM PT (ESPN)
@ Arizona

Saturday, Oct 29
4 PM PT (FSN)
vs California

Saturday, Nov 5
4:30 PM PT (Versus)
vs Arizona State

Saturday, Nov 12
3:30 PM PT (FSN)
@ Utah

Saturday, Nov 19
4:30pm PT (Versus)
vs Colorado

Saturday, Nov 26
7:00 PM PT (FSN)
@ USC

Pac-12 Championship Game
Friday, Dec 2
5:00 PM PT (Fox)
@ Oregon

Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl
Saturday, Dec 31
12:30 PM PT (ESPN)
vs. Illinois

The best waves in California

The August 2011 issue of Surfer magazine listed the 100 best waves. The majority of them were from Hawaii, Indo, and Australia but six Cali spots made the cut:

Rincon – #19
Lower Trestles – #28
Maverick’s – #55
Malibu – #59
Sandspit – #77
Blacks – #97

 

From the magazine:

Ranking waves? What were we thinking? It’s like trying to rank art pieces or putting a value on individual snowflakes.

We sent out ballots to surfers, photographers, journalists, and explorers – asking them to stick their necks out and provide us with their 20 best waves, listed in order of preference.

History of the Wetsuit: “I just wanted to be warm”

Yesterday the water here in Southern California dropped a full ten degrees overnight. It went from a bathing suit 66 to a freezing, it-hurts 56 degrees.

According to the lifeguards this is due to the last big-wave swell. It came in with a strong wind and in a few days had blown away the top cover of the ocean, revealing the cold depths.

It was pretty crazy, though, because the cold switch happened overnight. Yesterday it was warm and this morning it was freezing.

56 is so col that not a single person was in the water. Yet the temperature change happened so fast that people were still walking up in boardshorts ready to go out.

I went out and immediately left the water. It hurt!

A few hours later I returned with my winter booties and full wetsuit. This left only my hands and head exposed and I was able to stay out surfing for a long time.

Occasionally, others would join me, then after 10 minutes retreat back to the shore.

This prompted me to learn about the history of the wetsuit and my first search revealed..

 Jack O’Neill

You owe "The Cheese" a debt of gratitude. By developing the wetsuit, he allowed you to surf around the calendar and around the globe. His little shop in San Francisco is now a multimillion-dollar empire, but that wasn't why Jack O'Neill began. He just wanted to stay warm. "I'm just as surprised by this as anyone," O'Neill says. "I was just messing around with rubber."

full bio

History of the wetsuit

Before the wetsuit:

Surfers prepped for the frigid seas with frantic, almost tribal dances around beach fires, some taking to the water in wool sweaters (occasionally soaked in oil) and/or clunky, immobilizing scuba suits — anything to stave off impending numbness. Waveriding was commonly conservative; the rational being that not falling and thus staying dry was paramount to get radical. Enter Jack O’Neill, an inventive San Franciscan and window salesman by trade whose unwillingness to freeze his nuts off would revolutionize watergoing.

Following numerous aborted stabs at a functional, mobile suit, a bodysurfing friend who was working at a Bay Area pharmaceutical lab introduced O’Neill to a peculiar new rubber-like substance: neoprene. O’Neill quickly ordered heaps of the stuff, began hand sewing it together and, in 1952, started up San Francisco’s first surf shop along its Great Highway. Sales were brisker than the afternoon onshore winds that churned Ocean Beach. Later, he took to the road to market his invention, setting up ice-filled tanks in which he’d submerse his kids for hours to get the point across. Onlookers were stunned and overnight surfing became a year-round affair. O’Neill later moved his headquarters south to Santa Cruz, where both remain today.

full history

Back to O’Neill

Today, surfing is big business and the wetsuit industry is filled with competitors. Sometimes it’s hard to know what is good, but the O’Neill brand still stands for quality and is available in all the surf shops.

Which is pretty cool, a family company, the inventor of the wetsuit is still involved and still making the best. I think for my next wetsuit I will buy an O’Neill.

If you’re interested in learning more check out the cool website, or watch the video.

History of the Wetsuit: "I just wanted to be warm"

Yesterday the water here in Southern California dropped a full ten degrees overnight. It went from a bathing suit 66 to a freezing, it-hurts 56 degrees.

According to the lifeguards this is due to the last big-wave swell. It came in with a strong wind and in a few days had blown away the top cover of the ocean, revealing the cold depths.

It was pretty crazy, though, because the cold switch happened overnight. Yesterday it was warm and this morning it was freezing.

56 is so col that not a single person was in the water. Yet the temperature change happened so fast that people were still walking up in boardshorts ready to go out.

I went out and immediately left the water. It hurt!

A few hours later I returned with my winter booties and full wetsuit. This left only my hands and head exposed and I was able to stay out surfing for a long time.

Occasionally, others would join me, then after 10 minutes retreat back to the shore.

This prompted me to learn about the history of the wetsuit and my first search revealed..

 Jack O’Neill

You owe "The Cheese" a debt of gratitude. By developing the wetsuit, he allowed you to surf around the calendar and around the globe. His little shop in San Francisco is now a multimillion-dollar empire, but that wasn't why Jack O'Neill began. He just wanted to stay warm. "I'm just as surprised by this as anyone," O'Neill says. "I was just messing around with rubber."

full bio

History of the wetsuit

Before the wetsuit:

Surfers prepped for the frigid seas with frantic, almost tribal dances around beach fires, some taking to the water in wool sweaters (occasionally soaked in oil) and/or clunky, immobilizing scuba suits — anything to stave off impending numbness. Waveriding was commonly conservative; the rational being that not falling and thus staying dry was paramount to get radical. Enter Jack O’Neill, an inventive San Franciscan and window salesman by trade whose unwillingness to freeze his nuts off would revolutionize watergoing.

Following numerous aborted stabs at a functional, mobile suit, a bodysurfing friend who was working at a Bay Area pharmaceutical lab introduced O’Neill to a peculiar new rubber-like substance: neoprene. O’Neill quickly ordered heaps of the stuff, began hand sewing it together and, in 1952, started up San Francisco’s first surf shop along its Great Highway. Sales were brisker than the afternoon onshore winds that churned Ocean Beach. Later, he took to the road to market his invention, setting up ice-filled tanks in which he’d submerse his kids for hours to get the point across. Onlookers were stunned and overnight surfing became a year-round affair. O’Neill later moved his headquarters south to Santa Cruz, where both remain today.

full history

Back to O’Neill

Today, surfing is big business and the wetsuit industry is filled with competitors. Sometimes it’s hard to know what is good, but the O’Neill brand still stands for quality and is available in all the surf shops.

Which is pretty cool, a family company, the inventor of the wetsuit is still involved and still making the best. I think for my next wetsuit I will buy an O’Neill.

If you’re interested in learning more check out the cool website, or watch the video.